Liquefied Natural Gas Plant by Limult

The earth has enormous quantities of
natural gas, but much of it is in areas far from where the gas is needed. To
move this cleaner-burning fuel across oceans, natural gas must be converted
into liquefied natural gas (LNG), a process called liquefaction.

What is LNG –
liquefied natural gas?

LNG
is natural gas that has been cooled to –260° F (–162° C), changing it from a
gas into a liquid that is 1/600th of its original volume. This reduction in volume enables the gas to be transported
economically over long distances.

Liquefaction plants

 LNG liquefaction plants are generally
classified as baseload or peak shaving, depending on their purpose and size.
The process for the liquefaction of natural gas is essentially the same as that
used in modern domestic refrigerators, but on a massive scale. A refrigerant
gas is compressed, cooled, condensed, and let down in pressure through a valve
that reduces its temperature by the Joule-Thomson effect. The refrigerant gas
is then used to cool the feed gas. The temperature of the feed gas is
eventually reduced to −161°C, the temperature at which methane, the main constituent
of natural gas, liquefies. At this temperature, all the other hydrocarbons in
the natural gas will also be in liquid form. In the LNG process, constituents
of the natural gas (propane, ethane, and methane) are typically used as
refrigerants either individually or as a mixture. Feed pretreatment and
refrigerant component recovery are normally included in the LNG liquefaction
facility. LPG and condensate may be recovered as byproducts.

How do we use
LNG?

LNG is returned to a
gaseous state at LNG import and regasification terminals around the world. Once
it has been warmed to become natural gas, it is dispersed through pipelines for
use by homes and businesses. It can be used in a variety of ways: Residential
uses for natural gas include cooking, heating homes and generating electricity,
while commercial uses for natural gas include heating, generating electricity,
manufacturing products like fertilizers, paints and medicines, and occasionally
fueling commercial vehicles.

Contact Us at +2347052446249 for more information on our refining industry development services or visit our store at www.limult.com/shop to see more products that we make available for the people.


Nigeria Minerals, Energy and Power by Limult

Nigeria has a variety of both renewable and nonrenewable resources, some of which have not yet been effectively tapped. Solar energy, probably the most extensive of the underutilized renewable resources, is likely to remain untapped for some time.

Resources extraction

This is the most important sector of the economy. The most economically valuable minerals are crude oil, natural gas, coal, tin, and columbite (an iron-bearing mineral that accompanies tin). Petroleum, first discovered in 1956, is the most important source of government revenue and foreign exchange. Most of the oil output comes from onshore fields in the Niger delta, although an increasing proportion of the crude is produced at offshore locations. There are oil refineries at Port HarcourtWarri, and Kaduna. Nigeria has been a member of OPEC since 1971.

There are vast reserves of natural gas, but most of the gas produced is a by-product of crude oil. In the past this was burned off, as there was no market for it, but production has since increased, and Nigeria became a globally ranked exporter of this commodity. Production has often been interrupted by protests, as the inhabitants of the oil-producing regions have demanded a larger share of the revenues.

Nigeria possesses significant reserves of coal, but these deposits are being developed gradually. Coal is used by the railroad, by traditional metal industries, and by power plants to generate electricity. Coal mining, initially concentrated around the city of Enugu and its environs, began in 1915. It declined after the late 1950s with the discovery of oil but subsequently increased. Substantial coal reserves of varying quality can be found in south-central states in a band that stretches from Benin to Cameroon. Deposits discovered more recently in the southwestern part of the country at Lafia-Obi are being developed for the Ajaokuta steel complex.

The Jos Plateau, where tin mining began in 1905, also contains columbite. By the early 21st century, the country’s tin-smelting capacity had not been reached, a result of diminished world demand in the late 1980s; production of columbite has also declined since the mid-1970s. There are iron ore deposits in the Lokoja area, and limestone occurs in many areas, where it is widely exploited for manufacturing cement and for use in the steel industry. Extensive iron ore deposits found in Kwara state have been exploited since 1984. Other mined minerals include gypsum, kaolin, barite, gold, sapphires, topazes, and aquamarines. There are also uranium deposits in the country.

Contact Us at +2347052446249 for more information on our refining industry development services or visit our store at www.limult.com/shop to see more products that we make available for the people.

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